Archive for February 2007

THE ART OF EATING by Vikram Karve

February 15, 2007

           

THE ART OF EATING

By

VIKRAM KARVE

 

 

Good food must be savored delicately; slowly, attentively and respectfully; in a befitting manner, with finesse and technique, with relish and appreciation and you will experience true gustatory delight. That’s the Art of Eating.

 

It’s sacrilege to eat in a ravenous and rapacious manner. And never eat when tired, angry, worried, tense, hurried, and at mealtimes refuse to think or talk about unpleasant subjects. It is best to eat alone, mindfully, with yourself, in glorious solitude, in a calm, serene, conducive and unhurried environment.   If you must have company, you must always eat with relaxed and tranquil people who love food and whose company you enjoy; never eat with “toxic”, “harried” or “stressed-out” people or in a tense or hurried atmosphere.

 

If you want to do full justice to good food, you must build up an appetite for it – merely being hungry is not enough. And the first step towards building up an appetite for good food is to think about it – simulated imaginative gustatory visualization to stimulate and prepare yourself for the sumptuous indulgence. An important thing we were taught at boarding school was to read the menu and prepare for the meal by beginning to imagine relishing each and every dish, from soup to pudding, in our mind’s eye.

 

Remember: First plan your “eat” and then eat your “plan”. It’s true. I eat my food twice. First in my mind’s eye – imagining, visualizing, “vicariously tasting”, fantasizing, strategizing on how I am going to savor and relish the dish to my utmost pleasure and satisfaction till my mouth waters and I desperately yearn to eat it. And then I do the honours – actually go ahead and eat it and enjoy the delightful experience.

 

Eating is not a gustatory experience alone; it’s visual and olfactory as well. Food must look good, smell good, taste good and, most importantly, make you feel good. The Art of Eating. It’s Holistic. Multidimensional. Encompassing all domains of your inner being.

 

Eat in silence. Mindfully. With full awareness. Savour the aroma, delicately place the food on your tongue, chew slowly and experience the variety of flavours as the permeate your taste buds, fully aware and sense the nourishment as the food dissolves and sinks deep within you. Chew your food to a pulp or milky liquid until it practically swallows itself. Never mix food and drink – alcohol dulls the taste buds, and olfactory sensation, and encumbers the unmitigated enjoyment of good food.  

 

You must always close your eyes during the process of eating. When you eat, you must eat; nothing else, no seeing, no hearing, no talking. No multitasking. Focus all your senses on your food, eat mindfully, meditatively, and you will attain a state of delightful bliss and happiness.

 

It’s simple. Create a positive eating atmosphere, honour your taste buds, respect your food and eat it in a proper state of mind, with love, zest, awareness and genuine appreciation and it will transport you to a state of bliss and happiness. And you will realize that there is no love greater than the love of food.

In a nutshell, this is ‘The Art of Eating’.

 

VIKRAM KARVE

vikramkarve@sify.com

 

http://vikramwkarve.blogspot.com

http://vikramkarve.sulekha.com

Aundh Food Walk

February 15, 2007

Aundh Food Walk

By

Vikram Karve

Come with me on a food walk in Aundh. Let’s start from the Body Gate or Bremen Chowk end of DP Road.

As you enter DP Road, to your right is a typical fruit juice bar cum pav bhaji open air place called Bala’s. I’m real hungry, so let’s move on.

There’s Baker’s Basket Cake shop to your left – it’s not my birthday, and cakes are not what I have in mind to satiate my pangs of hunger!

Just ahead there’s Bananas – a pizza, pasta fast food joint and Baskin Robbins. Looks good – maybe some other time.

Now we come to Deepak Sweets. Let’s stop and watch the cute young things relish  Bhel, Pani Puri, Chaat, Kachori, Samosas, Dhoklas and gorge on rasagullas and sweets.

Mann Dairy – Arguably the second best lassi in Pune (nearly as good as Shiv
Kailas opposite Pune Railway Station). A must on every food walk in Aundh. And next door is Radhika – an Idli / Dosa place. A little ahead on the opposite side of the road are Vishi’s and Mongini’s Snack and Bake shops. And just before Parihar Chowk is Arya’s pure veg and then there is a dark looking udipi managed permit room bar and restaurant of the ubiquitous type one sees outside every suburban railway station in Mumbai.

Cross the ITI Road and reach Parihar Sweets for a quick snack of Khasta Kachori, Samosa, Batata Vada and Jilebis. A little ahead is the unassuming Diwadkar [ of Karjat Batata Wada fame] an unpretentious down-to-earth eatery for Value For Money snacks.

Then comes my favorite multicuisine café named Polka Dots. Tasty food, but does not satiate!

And then we have the popular Shivsagar – A spruced up version of the ubiquitous Udipi eatery on finds in every nook and corner of Mumbai and Pune. And on the other side is the road is Jerry’s and Tasty Bite Takeaway. Doesn’t look appetizing. And the counter at Spencer’s.


DP Road turns left and we come to Rasoi – a Tandoori Place which appears run of the mill and doesn’t look inviting. A furlong ahead is the classy Seasons and at the end DP Road, where it meets ITI road is Sarjaa – a Mughlai, Punjabi family place.

Turn left on ITI Road and you will cross Kobe- the Sizzlers place, Pizza Hut, Pulse Ozone with its cafes and basement sweet stall called Kadai, where the malpuas are good, a van selling Burgers and a lady making dosas.

And of course we have the newly opened McDonalds opposite Convergys and on the

Aundh Road towards Khadki there’s the Spartan Irani-clone Maharashtra Restaurant, the Spicer’s Bakery stall and Babumoshai Bengali Sweets for roshogullas and lavang lata.

That’s all there is in Aundh. If you are a Foodie think twice before you decide to settle down in Aundh. You’ll have to go all the way to Camp or Pune City to relish authentic stuff.

VIKRAM KARVE

vikramkarve@sify.com

Aundh Food Walk

February 15, 2007

Aundh Food Walk

By

Vikram Karve

 

 

Come with me on a food walk in Aundh. Let’s start from the Body Gate or Bremen Chowk end of

DP Road

.

 

As you enter

DP Road

, to your right is a typical fruit juice bar cum pav bhaji open air place called Bala’s. I’m real hungry, so let’s move on.

 

There’s Baker’s Basket Cake shop to your left – it’s not my birthday, and cakes are not what I have in mind to satiate my pangs of hunger!

 

Just ahead there’s Bananas – a pizza, pasta fast food joint and Baskin Robbins. Looks good – maybe some other time.

 

Now we come to Deepak Sweets. Let’s stop and watch the cute young things relish  Bhel, Pani Puri, Chaat, Kachori, Samosas, Dhoklas and gorge on rasagullas and sweets.

 

Mann Dairy – Arguably the second best lassi in Pune (nearly as good as Shiv
Kailas opposite Pune Railway Station). A must on every food walk in Aundh. And next door is Radhika – an Idli / Dosa place. A little ahead on the opposite side of the road are Vishi’s and Mongini’s Snack and Bake shops. And just before Parihar Chowk is Arya’s pure veg and then there is a dark looking udipi managed permit room bar and restaurant of the ubiquitous type one sees outside every suburban railway station in Mumbai.

 

Cross the

ITI Road

and reach Parihar Sweets for a quick snack of Khasta Kachori, Samosa, Batata Vada and Jilebis. A little ahead is the unassuming Diwadkar [ of Karjat Batata Wada fame] an unpretentious down-to-earth eatery for Value For Money snacks.

 

Then comes my favorite multicuisine café named Polka Dots. Tasty food, but does not satiate!

 

And then we have the popular Shivsagar – A spruced up version of the ubiquitous Udipi eatery on finds in every nook and corner of Mumbai and Pune. And on the other side is the road is Jerry’s and Tasty Bite Takeaway. Doesn’t look appetizing. And the counter at Spencer’s.

 

DP Road

turns left and we come to Rasoi – a

Tandoori Place

which appears run of the mill and doesn’t look inviting. A furlong ahead is the classy Seasons and at the end

DP Road

, where it meets ITI road is Sarjaa – a Mughlai, Punjabi family place.

 

Turn left on

ITI Road

and you will cross
Kobe- the Sizzlers place, Pizza Hut, Pulse Ozone with its cafes and basement sweet stall called Kadai, a van selling Burgers and a lady making dosas.

 

And of course we have the newly opened McDonalds opposite Convergys and on the

Aundh Road

towards Khadki there’s the Spartan Irani-clone Maharashtra Restaurant, the Spicer’s Bakery stall and Babumoshai Bengali Sweets for roshogullas and lavang lata.

 

That’s all there is in Aundh. If you are a Foodie think twice before you decide to settle down in Aundh. You’ll have to go all the way to Camp or

Pune
City to relish authentic stuff.

 

 

VIKRAM KARVE

vikramkarve@sify.com

 

 

 

 

 

Polka Dots

February 15, 2007

POLKA DOTS – A CUTE LITTLE MULTICUISINE CAFÉ IN AUNDH PUNE.

By

VIKRAM KARVE

It’s almost dark; Overcast Sky; Thunder, Winds and Rain; lights go off (so typical of Pune – a bit of wind, a hint of rain and the electricity fails); a depressing evening. My daughter says: “Let’s go to Polka Dots. It’s nearby and my friends tell me it’s good!”

So we land up at ‘Polka Dots’ – a cute little eating place on DP Road near Parihar Chowk in Aundh, Pune.

The café (I wouldn’t call it a restaurant) is on the side of a house, the seating well covered, the cooking area open and airy.

It’s a multicuisine eatery and the menu is confusing – it features vignettes of all types of cuisine so one can’t really classify the genre of this eating place – so we order a Roast Chicken Lyonnaise for my daughter, a Chicken Corden-Bleu (I suspect the spellings may be wrong but that’s how they spell it!) for me and a Mexican Corn & Jalapeno for my vegetarian wife.

 

The Chicken Corden Blue is excellent – succulent breast of chicken in a bed of mint flavored mashed potatoes drenched in delicious sauce is exquisite. The Chicken Roast is scrumptious – reminds me of the Roast Chicken I used to relish at the Sassanian Boulangerie near Metro in Mumbai. My son devours a Shepherd’s Pie – I taste a bit – it’s wholesome, nourishing and delicious. My wife tells me that the vegetarian corn and jalapeno was excellent too.

If you love a potpourri of cuisine from around the world, try the place; you may find it a bit expensive, but it’s okay once in a while. The crowd is young and the ambience is lively. And do let me know if you liked the place.

VIKRAM KARVE

Aundh, Pune

vikramkarve@sify.com

Dabba Gosht

February 15, 2007

DABBA GOSHT

(The ultimate mutton delicacy)

By

VIKRAM KARVE 

Dabba Gosht! If you’ve tasted it you know it’s unmatched, unparalleled – the ultimate amongst mutton dishes in Indian Cuisine. Dabba means ‘tin’ and Gosht means ‘meat’ – does this imply that Dabba Gosht is mutton cooked in a tin? I don’t know. Wait a minute. Dabba, pronounced differently, also means ‘press’.  I’ve heard a theory, maybe apocryphal, that the dish is called Dabba Gosht because the boneless meat pieces are pressed against a special stone to enable the marinade and masalas to permeate thoroughly and make the boneless mutton pieces truly delicious, succulent and melt-in-the-mouth. 

I love Dabba Gosht. It’s a rare dish and only very few select eateries feature it on their menu. I’ve savored it in Mumbai, at Delhi Darbar and Baghdadi (it’s a special dish available only once a week, on Sundays, I think), and I’ve heard it’s available at Noorani and George and maybe a couple of select places in Mumbai. But I never imagined I would be able to relish a fantastic Dabba Gosht (the best I’ve tasted) in Pune, of all places, and that too not at the most likely suspects like Good Luck at Deccan, and the expected eateries in Camp, but at Sadanand (no, not the vegetarian eatery near Crawford Market), Sadanand Resorts, to be precise, located opposite Balewadi, at the junction of Baner Road and Katraj Bypass, and was pleasantly surprised to find Dabba Gosht listed on the Menu.   

I ordered this rare dish with a bit of trepidation, but let me tell you the Dabba Gosht was superb – generous boneless mutton pieces, soft, juicy, succulent, releasing scrumptious flavor as they melted in my mouth and the yummy, delectable luxuriously thick white gravy made rich, wholesome and nutritious by the sumptuous combination of ingredients like cashew (kaju) paste, fresh cream and eggs. With hot roomali roti it was a rare and magnificent eating experience which makes my mouth water even as I write this now. Dabba Gosht and Roomali Roti – a supreme feast fit for the kings! Wherever you are, search for Dabba Gosht, and then relish it to your heart’s content. And don’t forget to tell me about it! 

VIKRAM KARVE

vikramkarve@sify.com

http://karve.reddiffiland.com

http://blogs.sify.com/vikramkarve

Rustic Indian Chicken Curry Dhaba Style

February 15, 2007

MOUTHWATERING MEMORIES – RUSTIC INDIAN CHICKEN CURRY AT A WAYSIDE DHABA IN VIZAG

By

VIKRAM KARVE

 

 

It’s a cold, damp and depressing evening in the back of beyond place where I now live.. There is an ominous wind, menacing lightening and disturbing thunder, and it starts to rain. Predictably, the lights go off, adding to the gloomy atmosphere.

My spirits plummet and I sit downcast in desolate silence and indulge in forlorn self-commiseration mourning the past (which makes me feel miserable), speculating the future (which causes me anxiety) and ruining my present moment (which makes me melancholic).

 

Whenever I am in a blue mood, two things are guaranteed to lift my spirits – good food and beautiful women – or even merely thinking about them in my mind’s eye. [In fact, I dread that the day I stop relishing good food, or appreciating beautiful women, for on that day I will know that I have lost the zest for living and I am as good as a dead man!]. As I languish out here in this godforsaken environment bereft of gustatory or visual stimulation (Colaba and Churchgate but distant memories), I close my eyes and seek to simulate my senses (that’s the trick – if you can’t stimulate; then simulate) trying to think interesting thoughts, evoke happy nostalgia, and suddenly a mouthwatering memory rekindles my spirits as I vividly remember the tastiest chicken curry I ever eaten and truly relished long back, almost twenty years ago, sometime in the eighties, at a rustic wayside dhaba on the highway near Visakhapatnam , or Vizag as we knew  it.

 

The ramshackle place was called NSTL Dhaba, why I do not know, and maybe it does not exist now, or may have metamorphosed into the ubiquitous motel-type restaurants one sees on our highways. We reached there well past midnight, well fortified and primed, as one must be when one goes to a dhaba, ordered the chicken curry and watched it being cooked.

 

Half the joy of enjoying delicious food is in watching it being made – imbibing the aroma and enjoying the sheer pleasure of observing the cooking process. And in this Dhaba the food is made in front of you in the open kitchen which comprises an open air charcoal bhatti with a tandoor and two huge cauldrons embedded and a couple of smaller openings for a frying pan or vessel.

 

They say that the best way to make a fish curry is to catch the fish fresh and cook it immediately. Similarly, the best way to make a chicken curry is to cut a chicken fresh and cook it immediately with its juices intact. And remember to use country chicken or desi murgi or gavraan kombdi for authentic taste.

 

And that is what is done here. The chicken is cut after you place the order and the freshly cut, dressed and cleaned desi murgi is thrown whole into the huge cauldron full of luxuriantly thick yummy looking gravy simmering over the slow fire.

 

 

 How do you cook your Indian Mutton or Chicken curries? Do you fry the meat and then add water and cook it, or do you cook (boil) the meat first and then fry it? Here the chicken will be cooked first in the gravy, on a slow fire, lovingly and unhurriedly, and then stir fried later (tadka ).

 

There are a number of whole chickens floating in the gravy and the cook is keeping an eagle eye on each and every one of them, and from time to time gently nurturing and helping them absorb the flavor and juices of the gravy (As the chickens absorb the gravy they become heavier and acquire an appetizing glaze). Once the cook feels a chicken is ready (30-40 minutes of gentle slow nurtured cooking), he takes out the chicken, chops it up, and throws it into a red-hot wok pan to stir fry basting with boiling oil and then ladles in a generous amount of gravy from the cauldron. When ready the chicken curry is garnished with crisp fried onion strips and coriander and savored with hot tandoori roti. We have a bowl of dal (simmering in the other cauldron) duly “tadkofied” as a side dish. The chicken is delicious and the gravy is magnificent. Ambrosia! We eat to our heart’s content – a well-filled stomach radiates happiness!

 

I still remember how delightfully flavorsome, tasty and nourishing every morsel was, and just thinking about the lip-smacking rustic chicken curry has made me so ravenously hungry that I’m heading for one of those untried and “untasted” Dhabas in my vicinity to sample their wares.

 

If I don’t find it anywhere I’m going to try and make this rustic chicken curry at home. And if anyone in Vizag is reading this, do let us know whether the highway dhaba still exists or has it vanished.

 

Till next time,

Happy Eating

 

 

VIKRAM KARVE

vikramkarve@sify.com

 

http://vikramkarve.sulekha.com

 

http://vikramkarve.gather.com

 

 

 

 

Delicious Lamingtons at Spicer Bakery Pune

February 15, 2007

LAMINGTON AT SPICER

( a melt in the mouth treat )

By

VIKRAM KARVE 

In the evening I often go for a walk on Aundh Road from Bremen Chowk towards the railway line at Khadki. It’s one of the best places to walk in Pune, wide roads with plenty of greenery and foliage on both sides. And on my way back I treat myself with a Lamington at the Spicer College Bakery Shop. I delicately place the soft delicacy between my lips, press and squeeze a piece of the wonderful stuff on my tongue. I close my eyes in order to enhance the experience of supreme bliss as the Lamington melts in my mouth and the chocolatty-coconutty luscious syrupy sweetness permeates into me.   

A Lamington is a delicious cube of sponge cake, dipped in melted chocolate and sugar and coated in desiccated coconut. They originated in Australia around 1898 in what later became the state of Queensland. Whilst the origin of the name for the Lamington cannot be accurately established, there are several theories. 

Lamingtons are most likely named after Charles Baillie, 2nd Baron Lamington, who served as Governor of Queensland from 1896 to 1901. However, the precise reasoning behind this is not known, and stories vary. According to one account, the dessert resembled the homburg hats favoured by Lord Lamington. Another tells of a banquet in Cloncurry during which the governor accidentally dropped a block of sponge cake into a dish of gravy, and then threw it over his shoulder, causing it to land in a bowl of desiccated coconut or peanut butter. A diner thought of replacing the gravy with chocolate and thus created the lamington as we know it today. Ironically, Lord Lamington was known to have hated the dessert that had been named in his honour, once referring to them as “those bloody poofy woolly biscuits”. Another theory is that they were named after Lady Lamington, the wife of the Governor.

 The Spicer College Bakery Lamington is my favourite – and can you imagine it costs just Eight Rupees [that’s six Lamingtons for a Dollar, for those who think in Dollars!].  The chocolate icing keeps the cake moist. The desiccated coconut protects it from drying out in the hot climate. And it’s quite a juicy generous lip-smacking treat! 

The Spicer College Bakery serves a variety of healthy goodies like carrot cake, nut cake, doughnuts, samosas, soy patties, soya milk; but, for me, it’s always the yummy succulent Lamington! 

VIKRAM KARVE

Pune, India

 vikramkarve@sify.com 

http://vikramkarve.gather.com  

Kathi Rolls in Pune

February 15, 2007


OLYMPIA ON EAST STREET – THE PLACE FOR KATHI ROLLS IN PUNE

By

Vikram Karve


Olympia. The very mention of the word “Olympia” makes every ardent Foodie’s mouth water as it immediately brings fond memories of the unique eatery on Colaba Causeway in Mumbai which arguably serves the best Biryani in the world apart from other lip smacking non-vegetarian delights.

But, do you know there is an “Olympia” on East Street opposite Kayani Bakery in Pune which serves perhaps the best Chicken Kathi Rolls outside of Kolkata. Priced at a reasonable forty rupees it is value for money nourishment at its best. The piping hot paratha enriched with a generous and well cooked soft covering of beaten eggs and filled with substantial pieces of succulent spicy chicken – it tastes heavenly as you dip it in the accompanying pudina chutney and pop it on your tongue along with a freshly sliced onion ring. The Chicken Kathi Roll is substantial and you feel truly satiated; unlike the empty feeling you get after having other fast foods like pizzas and burgers.

Earlier this no-nonsense down-to-earth eatery was housed in a charming old-world bungalow at the same location where now stands a modern building with the new looking Olympia on a small part of the ground floor. But the ambience and food is still as before.

Next time you are in Pune Camp don’t forget to visit Olympia on East Street and relish its delicious Kathi Roll. And don’t forget to pick up some Shrewsbury biscuits from Kayani Bakery opposite on your way home.

VIKRAM KARVE

 

vikramkarve@sify.com

vikramkarve@hotmail.com

 

http://vikramkarve.sulekha.com

 

http://vikramkarve.livejournal.com

 

Kerala Cuisine in Mumbai

February 15, 2007

FOUNTAIN
PLAZA
(KERALA CUISINE IN THE HEART OF MUMBAI)

By

Vikram Karve 

  

  

If you happen to be in Fort area of Mumbai, are famished and hungry for a sumptuous lunch, and in a mood for Kerala cuisine, try  Fountain Plaza. There a number of eateries who derive their names from the erstwhile Flora Fountain (now Hutatma Chowk) and I’m not referring to the more famous Fountain Restaurant opposite HSBC Bank which is a Sizzler and Steak place, or Fountain Inn, the Mangalorean seafood eatery in Nanabhai Lane. I am referring to Hotel Fountain Plaza, on RD Street off DN Road, near Handloom House next to Eastern Watch Company, my favorite Kerala Cuisine restaurant in South Mumbai. There is plenty to choose from – Fish, Chicken and Mutton, not much a choice for vegetarians, except in the snacks department, which you can try at “Tiffin Time” in the evenings. 

To start off, I like the Fish Curry in white coconut gravy with Malabari Paratha (Parota) with a fried Pomfret on the side. I pop a piece of the succulent fish on my tongue, followed by a generously soaked portion of the soft paratha in the delicious rich gravy, close my eyes, and press the juicy food between my tongue and palate. Never bite, just press the tongue upwards against your palate and savor the heavenly taste as the fish disintegrates releasing the delicious juices and spicy flavor. 

Next I order a Chicken Korma (the Chicken Stew is good too) with Appams and then have my favorite Malabari style Mutton Biryani. The place evokes nostalgic memories of Ceylon Bake House in Ernakulam. 

There are a large number of dishes on the menu including Chinese and “Mughlai”, but at Fountain Plaza it’s better to focus on Kerala Cuisine. If you are heading home in the evening, stop by for tiffin, and enjoy an evening ‘banana based’ snack like banana roast, banana fry, banana bonda etc which are the specialty of the place with a cup of tea or coffee. 

I like Fountain Plaza. A no-nonsense Spartan eatery. Mouthwatering food. Nourishing snacks. Lip smacking gravies. Satiating meals. Value For Money eating. Next time you are in Fort, Mumbai, give the place a try, and let me know if you liked it. 

  

  

VIKRAM KARVE  

vikramkarve@sify.com

http://vikramkarve.sulekha.com

  

  

The Best Vegetarian Lunch in Mumbai

February 15, 2007

A Sumptuous Lunch

by

Vikram Karve

 

 

If you are ravenously hungry on a busy afternoon in the heart Mumbai, head for Bhagat Tarachand (BT). To get there, walk up Kalbadevi Road from Metro, turn right at the Cotton Exchange, and to your left you will see a series of eateries named Bhagat Tarachand. All are equally good and serve similar food, so you can sample them one by one on your numerous visits and decide which one you like. You can also walk up from Crawford Market, through Zaveri Bazar, past the Gold Exchange and Mumbadevi Temple; or from Bhendi Bazar via Pydhonie down Kalbadevi Road. In case you live in the suburbs, get down at Charni Road station, walk down Thakurdwar Road and turn right at Bhuleshwar and walk past the Cotton Exchange. Don’t try to drive down – you’ll go crazy negotiating your way – and besides a brisk walk on a hot and humid Mumbai afternoon will build up a voracious appetite and rapacious thirst – sine qua non for total enjoyment of a delicious nourishing meal.

The first thing to do is to order a “beer bottle” of chilled chaas (buttermilk) to quench your thirst and soothe your parched throat. On your first visit sample the delectable thali comprising varied vegetable dishes, dal and melt-in-the-mouth chappaties. Once you are hooked on, on subsequent visits you can experiment with the variety of rotis and vegetarian delights in Bhagat Tarachand’s culinary repertoire. Each and every dish – the dal fry, paneer bhurji, methi malai mutter, bhindi, even baingan – is superb. Both tastewise and pricewise, Bhagat Tarachand is unmatched – it’s the best value for money vegetarian food in Mumbai.

Once you have relished your hearty meal, leisurely stroll down (digestive walk) past the Cotton Exchange and Panjrapole towards Bhuleshwar, turn right on VP Road towards CP Tank and soon you will reach Bhaishankar Gaurishankar which serves the most delicious lip-smacking rasgullas in Mumbai. As the luscious heavenly syrupy delights melts in your mouth you will experience such a fantastic blissful ecstasy that words cannot describe. A perfect ending to a perfect meal!

 

VIKRAM KARVE

 

vikramkarve@sify.com

 

http://360.yahoo.com/vikramkarve